The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    More on calcium supplements and the risk of cardiovascular disease

    Calcium supplements are widely used to help prevent osteoporosis but have been associated with a possible increase in the risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

    Now, researchers from the UK and Denmark have presented an alternative view.

    The evidence for cardiovascular benefits.

    • The evidence supporting calcium + vitamin D as an adjunct to bisphosphonates (Actonel, Boniva, others) to treat osteoporosis is reassuring in terms of cardiovascular safety and improved survival.
      • In a retrospective review of 23,615 patients, calcium + vitamin D or vitamin D + anti-osteoporotic drugs reduced mortality in men by 28% and women by 38%.
    • Because of limitations in study design, it’s not possible to be sure that calcium supplements + vitamin D will not cause adverse cardiovascular events or to link them with certainty to increased cardiovascular risk.

    The bottom line?

    “Clearly,” conclude the authors, “further studies are needed and the debate remains ongoing.”

    4/26/11 21:22 JR

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