The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

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  • Recent Comments

    Review: CAM for infantile colic

    Almost all babies go through a fussy period. When crying lasts for longer than about 3 hours a day and is not caused by a medical problem (such as a hernia or infection), it is called colic.

    Prof. Ernst and colleagues evaluated nutritional supplements and other complementary and alternative medicines.

    First, the details.

    • 15 studies in 944 infants met the inclusion criteria.
      • 13 studies were placebo controlled.
      • 8 were of good methodological quality.
      • None of these studies were without flaws.

    And, the results.

    • A variety of treatments were studied: manipulation, herbal, glucose and sucrose preparations, probiotics, massage, and reflexology.
    • 11 studies indicated a significant result in favor of CAM.
      • Fennel extract
      • Herbal tea
      • Colimil (an herbal compound containing fennel, lemon balm, and chamomile).
    • Independent replications were missing for most treatments.

    The bottom line?

    The authors concluded, “The notion that any form of complementary and alternative medicine is effective for infantile colic currently is not supported from the evidence from the included randomized clinical trials. Additional replications are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.”

    3/28/11 20:11 JR

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