The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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  • Recent Comments

    Sweet solutions help infants tolerate immunizations

    Researchers from The Hospital for Sick Children, in Toronto, Canada reviewed the evidence for giving sweet solutions to infants before immunization.

    First, the details.

    • 14 studies with 1674 injections met the inclusion criteria.

    And, the results.

    • Sucrose or glucose decreased crying during or following immunization compared to water or no treatment in 13 of 14 studies.
    • Infants receiving 30% glucose had a decreased relative risk of crying following immunization.
    • With sucrose or glucose, there was a 10% reduction in proportion of crying time and a 12 second reduction in crying duration.
    • An optimal dose of sucrose or glucose could not be ascertained due to the varied volumes and concentrations used.

    The bottom line?

    Giving sucrose or glucose solutions before immunization has a moderate benefit on the incidence and duration of crying.

    It’s probably not necessary for all infants, but might be considered in babies who are particularly averse to being stuck with a needle.

    5/24/10 16:11 JR

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