The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    Web- and computer-based smoking cessation programs

    Researchers from South Korea and California reviewed the evidence.

    First, the details.

    • 22 studies, which included 29,549 participants, were included in the meta-analyses.

    And, the results.

    • Both web- and computer-based programs improved smoking cessation compared to the control group.
    • After 12 months of follow-up, abstinence was significantly higher with web- and computer-based programs vs controls (10% vs 6%, respectively).
    • The programs didn’t significantly increase abstinence rates among adolescents compared to adults.

    The bottom line?
    The researchers said these effects of Web- or computer-based interventions were similar to those of counseling.

    It’s not easy to stop smoking, as these results attest.

    But it’s important.

    “Around 40% of the fall in the number of deaths from cancer among U.S. men from 1991 to 2003 can be attributed to the decline in smoking,” say researchers from the American Cancer Society.

    6/6/09 19:20 JR

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