The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

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  • Recent Comments

    Is sham acupuncture really a placebo?

    Sham needling may be as powerful as verum (traditional) acupuncture, according to researchers from the Karolinska Institutet, in Stockholm, Sweden.

    The case against using sham acupuncture as a placebo.

    • Clinical and experimental results suggest that sham/minimal acupuncture is not inert.
      • Both verum and sham/minimal acupuncture induce significant alleviation of pain.
      • This alleviation is as pronounced as the response to standard treatment and more obvious compared to placebo or waiting list controls.
    • These results also suggest that sham acupuncture needles evoke a physiological response.
    • In healthy individuals sham acupuncture activates limbic structures, whereas it deactivates it in patients with pain.
      • Limbic structures in the brain are involved in emotional behavior.
    • The response to sham acupuncture varies depending on the source of pain, the way the study is conducted, and the patients psychological makeup.

    The bottom line?
    The authors recommend that the response to acupuncture should be compared with the standard treatment being studied, taking into consideration patient factors that might affect the outcome.

    Others have also raised doubt about the validity of traditional acupuncture theories regarding point locations and indications.

    6/16/09 18:25 JR

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