The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    Another chelation study canceled

     It was designed to study the effects of chelation in patients who had survived a heart attack.

    The study was killed after more than 2 patients died among 1500 heart attack survivors who were recruited. It’s not yet known if the deaths were related to chelation therapy.

    Other problems

    • The patient consent form didn’t disclose that people have died as a result of chelation therapy.
    • More than half the doctors participating as researchers were making money selling chelation treatment — a conflict of interest.
    • Some doctors involved in the study had been disciplined by state boards or had criminal records and were asked to drop out.

    The bottom line?
    When the study was approved in 2002, federal officials said many heart patients were exploring chelation therapy, and the research would give answers about whether the treatment was safe and effective.

    A call to Calgary in Alberta, Canada or perusal of the Journal of the American Medical Association might have provided useful insight.

    In 2002, Canadian researchers participating in the Program to Assess Alternative Treatment Strategies to Achieve Cardiac Health (PATCH) reported no benefits following 33 chelation treatments compared to placebo in 84 patients with ischemic heart disease (eg, angina pectoris, acute heart attack, and chronic ischemic heart disease).

    The authors concluded, “There is no evidence to support a beneficial effect of chelation therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease, stable angina, and a positive treadmill test for ischemia.”

    Less than 2 weeks ago, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) canceled a chelation study for autism.

    9/29/08 18:59 JR

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