The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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  • Recent Comments

    Cost-effective naturopathic care for low back pain

    In this study by researchers in Canada and the US, combining several treatments under the umbrella of naturopathic care was better than simply giving advice.

    First, the details.

    • 70 warehouse workers with low back pain were studied.
    • The cost-effectiveness of naturopathic care (acupuncture, relaxation exercises, exercise, and dietary advice, and a back care booklet) was compared to standardized physiotherapy education and a back care booklet (control treatment).

    And, the results.

    • Naturopathic care significantly improved quality-adjusted life-years over the 6-month study (3 months treatment plus a 3-month follow-up) vs control treatment.
    • Naturopathic care significantly reduced societal costs by $1212 per participant.
    • From the perspective of the employer, the naturopathic care cost $154 per absentee day avoided (compared to the cost of lost productivity of $172 per day) and had a return on investment of 7.9% under healthcare coverage limits, assuming the employer paid the full cost of naturopathic care.
    • Each participants saved $1096 in adjunctive care costs (chiropractic, massage, physiotherapy).

    The bottom line?
    The study shows that actions speak louder than words. That is to say, naturopathic care as defined by the application of acupuncture, relaxation exercises, and exercise, plus dietary advice and a back care booklet is better than simply advising patients about physiotherapy and giving them a book.

    As an initial study to show that active care is better than placebo, this study is useful. Of greater value will be subsequent studies (hopefully) that compare different active care options.

    The study was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).

    4/6/08 11:02 JR

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