The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

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  • Recent Comments

    Mediterranean diet for Alzheimer’s disease?

    A study of more than 2000 non-demented individuals conducted in 2006 concluded that better adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Now, the Mediterranean diet appears useful in people already diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

    During this year’s annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Boston, results were presented from a study of 195 community-based patients with Alzheimer’s disease who were followed for an average of 4 years.

    Those who adhered to the diet (high intake of vegetables, legumes, fruits, cereals, and fish; low intake of saturated fatty acids, dairy products, meat, and poultry with a mild-to-moderate amount of alcohol) had a lower mortality rate compared with those who did not adhere to the Mediterranean diet. The positive results were confirmed when adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, education, ApoE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index.

    The bottom line?
    These findings suggest that the Mediterranean diet not only favorably affects the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, but also improves the disease course.

    8/21/07 21:26 JR

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