The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    Using creatine to treat dermatomyositis and polymyositis

    The former produces skin inflammation and muscle weakness. People with the later condition get weakness of limb and neck muscles, with muscle pain and swelling.

    First, the details.

    • Over 6 months, 37 patients were randomly assigned to take creatine supplements by mouth (8 days, 20 gm/day then 3 gm/day) or placebo.
    • All patients followed a home exercise program.

    And the results.

    • Aggregate functional performance time (AFPT), a test of the ability to do high-intensity exercise, improved significantly at 6 months with creatine compared to placebo.
    • The functional index (endurance) improved significantly in both groups.
    • No significant side effects were reported.

    Too bad they didn’t evaluate quality of life or changes in the patients’ activities during the day.

    Creatine is made from amino acids primarily in the kidney and liver, and transported in the blood for use by muscles. MayoClinic.com has a concise review.

    A review on Medscape concluded, “While creatine may enhance the performance of high-intensity, short-duration exercise, it is not useful in endurance sports.” This study appears to support that view.

    5/25/07 19:24 JR

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