The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

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    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

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  • Recent Comments

    Zinc carnosine stimulates repair of intestinal damage

    Indomethacin (Indocin) can cause serious intestinal side effects including inflammation, bleeding, and ulcers. So, if you’re going to test the value of a supplement that claims to protect the intestines, what better than to see if it protects against indomethacin side effects.

    Here are the details.

    • 10 healthy volunteers took two treatments
    • Indomethacin 50 mg 3 times daily plus zinc carnosine 37.5 mg twice-daily for 5 days
    • The same dose of indomethacin plus placebo for 5 days
    • Lab studies were done to measure the changes caused during the treatments

    And the results

    • Zinc carnosine stabilized intestinal mucosal cells and decreased the damage to the stomach and small intestines caused by indomethacin.

    “Importantly, these effects were seen at concentrations likely to be found in participants taking the product as a health food supplement,” concluded the researchers.

    Don’t confuse zinc carnosine with zinc sulfate. More on the differences and research being done with the former to treat ulcers can be found here.

    3/2/07 13:37 JR

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