The C.A.M. Report
Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Fair, Balanced, and to the Point
  • About this web log

    This blog is intended as an objective and dispassionate source of information on the latest CAM research. Since my background is in pharmacy and allopathic medicine, I view all CAM as advancing through the development pipeline to eventually become integrated into mainstream medical practice. Some will succeed while others fail. But all are treated fairly here.

  • About the author

    John Russo, Jr., PharmD, is president of The MedCom Resource, Inc. Previously, he was senior vice president of medical communications at www.Vicus.com, a complementary and alternative medicine website.

  • Common sense considerations

    The material on this weblog is for informational purposes. It is not medical advice or counsel. Be smart, consult your health professional before using CAM.

  • Support this site

    If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.If you found the information here helpful, please consider supporting this site.

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    Magnetic stimulation lowers use of pain meds following gastric bypass surgery

    I love the studies on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It’s magnet therapy for the 21st century — sort of.

    Here’s why the results of this latest study are important.

    Any treatment that reduces the need for pain medicine in obese patients following gastric bypass surgery is important. These patients often have obstructive sleep apnea, right heart dysfunction, and pulmonary hypertension. And opioids can make these problems worse.

    Here are the results of a new study of rTMS on pain med use in obese patients following surgery.

    • 20 gastric bypass patients randomly assigned to 20 minutes of active or sham left prefrontal rTMS immediately after surgery
    • Morphine use 40% less in patients treated with active prefrontal rTMS compared to sham rTMS during the 44 hours after surgery
    • Significant effects regardless of surgery type (open vs. laparoscopic)
    • The effect was most prominent during the first 24 hours after treatment
    • No effect on mood ratings.

    It seems there is a potential new noninvasive method for managing postoperative morphine use.

    10/1/06 23:12 JR

    Leave a Comment

    XHTML: Line-breaks are automatic. Available tags are <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>